Thursday, 20 July 2017

Scientists Engineer Spinach Leaves to Detect Explosives

Technology

spinach leaves nanobionics explosives

Researchers from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have ingrained carbon nanotubes inside spinach leaves, turning the leaves into sensing units which are able to communicate with humans. This particular application is amongst the 1st demos of plant nanobionics, an area of research that rig electronic systems inside living plants.

“The goal of plant nanobionics is to install nanoparticles into the plant in order to give it non-native functionalities,” MIT Carbon P. Dubbs Professor of Chemical Engineering Michael Strano explained.

In this particular instance, the carbon nanotubes inserted in plants were fabricated to sense nitroaromatics, chemical compounds commonly used in bombs, present within groundwater. Upon detection, the leaves of the spinach plant produce a fluorescent signal which an infrared camera connected to a smartphone-sized computer examines. The computing device then wirelessly delivers an e-mail to alert about the chemicals.

Plant Nanobionics

Because they naturally take in extensive information from their surroundings, plants are the perfect choice for environmental monitoring. “Plants are excellent analytical chemists,” Stano remarked, “They have an extensive root network inside the ground, are continuously sampling groundwater, and have a method to self-power the transport of that ground water up into the leaves.”

Plant nanobionics was first demonstrated by Strano and his team a couple of years ago when these experts enhanced plants’ photosynthesis capability with nanoparticles so that they could sense the combustion pollutant nitric oxide. The research team has also utilized carbon nanotube implants in leaves in order to sense more than explosives: they have engineered plants that can detect dopamine, hydrogen peroxide, and the nerve agent, sarin – which was used in the deadly attacks recently inside Syria.

The researchers also plan to utilize this technology to combat drought and improve crop yields by optimizing soil quality. “These sensors give real-time data from the plant. It is almost like having the plant speak to us regarding the environment they operate in,” graduate student and scientist Min Hao Wong informed MIT News. “When it comes to precision agriculture, possessing such info can directly influence yield and margins.”

The post Scientists Engineer Spinach Leaves to Detect Explosives appeared first on GadgTecs.



from GadgTecs http://bit.ly/2gMNlCh
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Scientists Engineer Spinach Leaves to Detect Explosives

https://gadgtecs.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/spinach-leaves-nanobionics-explosives.jpg

Researchers from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have ingrained carbon nanotubes inside spinach leaves, turning the leaves into sensing units which are able to communicate with humans. This particular application is amongst the 1st demos of plant nanobionics, an area of research that rig electronic systems inside living plants.

"The goal of plant nanobionics is to install nanoparticles into the plant in order to give it non-native functionalities," MIT Carbon P. Dubbs Professor of Chemical Engineering Michael Strano explained.

[embed]http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x5twz0e[/embed]

In this particular instance, the carbon nanotubes inserted in plants were fabricated to sense nitroaromatics, chemical compounds commonly used in bombs, present within groundwater. Upon detection, the leaves of the spinach plant produce a fluorescent signal which an infrared camera connected to a smartphone-sized computer examines. The computing device then wirelessly delivers an e-mail to alert about the chemicals.

Plant Nanobionics


Because they naturally take in extensive information from their surroundings, plants are the perfect choice for environmental monitoring. "Plants are excellent analytical chemists," Stano remarked, "They have an extensive root network inside the ground, are continuously sampling groundwater, and have a method to self-power the transport of that ground water up into the leaves."

Plant nanobionics was first demonstrated by Strano and his team a couple of years ago when these experts enhanced plants' photosynthesis capability with nanoparticles so that they could sense the combustion pollutant nitric oxide. The research team has also utilized carbon nanotube implants in leaves in order to sense more than explosives: they have engineered plants that can detect dopamine, hydrogen peroxide, and the nerve agent, sarin - which was used in the deadly attacks recently inside Syria.

[embed]http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x5twz0g[/embed]

The researchers also plan to utilize this technology to combat drought and improve crop yields by optimizing soil quality. "These sensors give real-time data from the plant. It is almost like having the plant speak to us regarding the environment they operate in," graduate student and scientist Min Hao Wong informed MIT News. "When it comes to precision agriculture, possessing such info can directly influence yield and margins."

https://gadgtecs.com/2017/07/20/scientists-engineer-spinach-leaves-detect-explosives/

Tuesday, 18 July 2017

Has Technological Advancement Led to More Opioid Addiction?

Technology

technology opioid addiction

As technology advances further and further, humankind is also experiencing an increasing opioid addiction epidemic. The question is, are these two facts independent of each other or are they related in some way? Let’s explore the potential relationship between technological advances and the increasing opioid addiction epidemic.

How Technology Points to Opioids

No definitive, scientific evidence directly connects technology to opioid addiction, but it’s worth taking a look at some of the facts. Technology can potentially affect opioid addictions in these ways:

  • Commercials and Advertisements for Drugs

Many people who get addicted to opioids start out with a prescription for a controlled opioid substance. There are many legal opiates, but they are controlled substances that require a doctor to provide a prescription first. It could be argued that constant exposure to advertisements for drugs containing opioids is influencing people to seek them out, which leads to higher usage and potentially higher numbers of addictions beginning.

  • Influencing Culture towards Fast Solutions

Most technology is geared towards giving you a quick fix, an easy solution, and a faster way to do different tasks. This has created a change in our perceptions, where we want to look for the easiest and quickest way to solve any problems or discomfort. In the case of many diseases for physical discomfort, we quickly turn to strong pain killers, such as opioids (think hydrocodone and oxycodone). This desire for quick solutions, pushed forward by constant new technological innovations, could be driving more people to become addicted accidentally.

  • Increased Access to Medical Information Online

Many websites written by pharmaceutical companies or uninformed people may recommend opioids too often for medical conditions. Or, wrong advice can be found online on how to take opioids safely. Increased access to medical information can help some patients take power over their treatment, but it also causes others to see a doctor and ask for a prescription they may not actually need for their condition. If a physician thinks any patient is having moderate to severe pain, prescription painkillers are often given.

  • Advanced Production of Opioids and “Pushing” by Drug Companies

The strongest argument for the relationship between technology and opioid addiction is that greater access to advertisements and competition between pharmaceutical companies has led to push ads. These types of advertisements tell viewers to ask their doctor about a particular prescription medication to help improve your life, whether you truly need it or not. Push adverts focus more on the potential benefits and tell you to ask and look for a particular medicine, only briefly mentioning that there may be significant life-altering consequences.

An Argument Against Technology’s Role in Pushing Addiction

All of the points made above can be argued against. Many would say that these do not point towards technology playing a significant role in opioid addictions. While it may be true that we now have greater access, more information, or more exposure to potentially misleading advertisements, those are not direct causes of opioid addiction. Advancing technology may not really be responsible for people becoming addicted to opioids in any way.

Conclusion

Whether or not technology does bring people closer to opioid addiction, it can assist you in finding help for addiction. You can learn more about opioids, why they’re addictive, and how to get help by finding treatment centers online.

The post Has Technological Advancement Led to More Opioid Addiction? appeared first on GadgTecs.



from GadgTecs http://bit.ly/2tb5ziH
http://bit.ly/2taY4rT

Has Technological Advancement Led to More Opioid Addiction?

https://gadgtecs.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/technology-opioid-addiction.jpg

As technology advances further and further, humankind is also experiencing an increasing opioid addiction epidemic. The question is, are these two facts independent of each other or are they related in some way? Let’s explore the potential relationship between technological advances and the increasing opioid addiction epidemic.

How Technology Points to Opioids


No definitive, scientific evidence directly connects technology to opioid addiction, but it’s worth taking a look at some of the facts. Technology can potentially affect opioid addictions in these ways:
  • Commercials and Advertisements for Drugs


Many people who get addicted to opioids start out with a prescription for a controlled opioid substance. There are many legal opiates, but they are controlled substances that require a doctor to provide a prescription first. It could be argued that constant exposure to advertisements for drugs containing opioids is influencing people to seek them out, which leads to higher usage and potentially higher numbers of addictions beginning.
  • Influencing Culture towards Fast Solutions


Most technology is geared towards giving you a quick fix, an easy solution, and a faster way to do different tasks. This has created a change in our perceptions, where we want to look for the easiest and quickest way to solve any problems or discomfort. In the case of many diseases for physical discomfort, we quickly turn to strong pain killers, such as opioids (think hydrocodone and oxycodone). This desire for quick solutions, pushed forward by constant new technological innovations, could be driving more people to become addicted accidentally.
  • Increased Access to Medical Information Online


Many websites written by pharmaceutical companies or uninformed people may recommend opioids too often for medical conditions. Or, wrong advice can be found online on how to take opioids safely. Increased access to medical information can help some patients take power over their treatment, but it also causes others to see a doctor and ask for a prescription they may not actually need for their condition. If a physician thinks any patient is having moderate to severe pain, prescription painkillers are often given.
  • Advanced Production of Opioids and “Pushing” by Drug Companies


The strongest argument for the relationship between technology and opioid addiction is that greater access to advertisements and competition between pharmaceutical companies has led to push ads. These types of advertisements tell viewers to ask their doctor about a particular prescription medication to help improve your life, whether you truly need it or not. Push adverts focus more on the potential benefits and tell you to ask and look for a particular medicine, only briefly mentioning that there may be significant life-altering consequences.

An Argument Against Technology’s Role in Pushing Addiction


All of the points made above can be argued against. Many would say that these do not point towards technology playing a significant role in opioid addictions. While it may be true that we now have greater access, more information, or more exposure to potentially misleading advertisements, those are not direct causes of opioid addiction. Advancing technology may not really be responsible for people becoming addicted to opioids in any way.

Conclusion


Whether or not technology does bring people closer to opioid addiction, it can assist you in finding help for addiction. You can learn more about opioids, why they’re addictive, and how to get help by finding treatment centers online.

https://gadgtecs.com/2017/07/18/technological-advancement-led-opioid-addictions/

Sunday, 16 July 2017

DIY – How To: Construct a Simple Trebuchet in less than $10

DIY - How To: Construct a Simple Trebuchet in less than $10

https://gadgtecs.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/DIY-How-To-Make-Trebuchet-1.jpg

This DIY project uses lower than $10 worth of supplies, mostly household items, requires no tools more sophisticated than a pair of scissors, and could be built in a couple of hours at max. It can fire small paper missiles etc. Bill Livolsi, from makerzine.com, constructed his first prototype in two hours. It didn’t work, so he constructed another one. The video above showcases his third attempt for the benefit of the viewers. Although there is a lot of room for improvement in this simple design, he believes it will get his point across: "you can make something from, effectively, nothing."

Things Required:

[caption id="attachment_2724" align="aligncenter" width="640"]DIY make a trebuchet Things required - Source: makezine.com[/caption]

Some nuts or washers (for weight), wooden sticks (less than $6), scissors, glue, toothpick, thread or string and some paper. Here you go:

[embed]http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x5tr2mn[/embed]

A bit of history

Trebuchets, a kind of siege weapons, that we mostly see (in movies?) are "counterweight trebuchet", which uses a counterweight to swing its arm. They first appeared in the 12th century AD in both Muslim and Christian lands around the Mediterranean and made its way to China via Mongol conquests in the 13th century. The first trebuchets actually were 'traction trebuchet' thought to be invented by the Chinese in the 4th century AD. Instead of a counterweight to fire the projectile, the traction trebuchet had many ropes which people pulled together to swing the arm!

Trebuchets are really fun. We hope you try this project and never get tired of flinging papers across. If possible, do record it or take pictures and send them to us so we can feature them on this page  :-)

 

https://gadgtecs.com/2017/07/17/diy-construct-simple-trebuchet/